Health Care

Many Americans Unaware of Promise of Targeted, ‘Personalized’ Medicine: Poll

News Picture: Many Americans Unaware of Promise of Targeted, 'Personalized' Medicine: PollBy Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Dec. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Medical science has made tremendous advances in “personalized medicine” — drugs that fight cancer and other diseases by boosting the immune system or targeting specific genetic traits.

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter benefited from one of these drugs, Keytruda (pembrolizumab), which successfully beat back his brain cancer by ramping up his immune system.

But the American public is still struggling to understand the implications of these new targeted treatments, a new HealthDay/Harris Poll has found.

A large majority (71 percent) of Americans are unfamiliar with personalized medicine, the survey found.

Among those who are familiar with the concept, nearly half (49 percent) don’t understand that this new type of therapy is typically more successful, with fewer side effects, compared to other treatments.

On the other hand, most (62 percent) didn’t realize that the cost of the drugs will be significantly higher than other treatments.

The online survey of over 2,000 adults was conducted Nov. 15-19.

“Very few Americans know a lot about personalized medicine but, nevertheless, people are excited about it, particularly regarding its potential to save lives and revolutionize health care,” said Deana Percassi, managing director of The Harris Poll’s public relations research practice.

Personalized medicine, also called precision medicine, uses genetic profiling and specific knowledge of a person’s body to optimize therapies.

For example, there’s a drug called Lynparza (olaparib) that treats people with advanced breast and ovarian cancers caused by mutations of the BRCA gene. The drug blocks an enzyme and makes it more likely for cancerous cells to die off more quickly.

In an advance for the field, last week the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a drug for a treatment of a wide range of cancers based on a shared mutation. The drug, Vitrakvi (larotrectinib), can treat thyroid, lung, and head and neck cancers caused by a common genetic factor.

Doctors need to spread the word

Despite advances like this, two in five people (41 percent) are not at all familiar with personalized medicine, and only 5 percent said they are very familiar, the survey found.

That doesn’t surprise Dr. Len Lichtenfeld, acting chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society.

“We’re all exposed to a lot of information on a regular basis,” Lichtenfeld said. “People tend to not pay a lot of attention to a particular topic until it becomes personally relevant to them.”

Dr. Bruce Johnson suggested that doctors “need to do a better job disseminating information about personalized medicine.” Johnson is past president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

“I’m a lung cancer doc. We just had our fifth drug for a specific genomic driver in lung cancer approved last week. That started out from zero in 2004,” Johnson said.

“As opposed to the old days, where drugs worked, on average, for four to six months, these currently are typically working between 10 months to three years,” Johnson said. “For patients with lung cancer, it’s dramatically transformed their lives. Our job is to get that information out there and make it clear.”

More and better treatment options

Lichtenfeld noted that the word needs to spread so people will know these drugs might be available to help them.

“I had a conversation with someone a couple of weeks ago who had a cancer, had a genetic test done on their cancer, and had a mutation for which there is a clinical trial, but no one had recognized that,” Lichtenfeld said.

“This was what I call an activated patient, an intelligent and engaged person,” he continued. “We need to do a better job, nationwide, understanding the options we now have.”

The general public also lacks knowledge of some key topics of debate surrounding personalized medicine.

More than half (60 percent) are unaware that the drugs used in personalized medicine tend to be much more expensive than more conventional treatments like chemotherapy.

Overall, 46 percent think the costs of personalized medicine for cancer patients will be similar to other available treatment options. Even among those who are familiar with personalized medicine, this percentage remains the same.

Further, about one in six (15 percent) thinks the costs of personalized medicine will be significantly lower than other treatment options.

Cost a big factor

In reality, personalized medicine costs a lot. People taking Keytruda pay around $150,000 a year, while Lynparza is estimated to cost more than $234,000 to extend a patient’s life by one year. Vitrakvi will cost $32,800 for a 30-day supply of capsules.

According to Percassi, “Even those who are familiar with the topic are relatively unaware of the extreme cost difference between personalized medicine and other available treatments.”

There’s currently a debate in medicine over the cost of these drugs, Lichtenfeld said.

On the one hand, these cutting-edge medicines are expensive to develop and often only help a small number of patients who carry the specific genetic trait being targeted, Lichtenfeld explained.


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Article source: http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=217073

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